Past Events

Friends of Textiles Lecture Series

“Hmong Paj ntaub: Cloth as Language” by Professor Geraldine Craig

Tuesday, October 17, 2017
Reception 5:15 p.m.; Lecture 6 p.m.
Denius Student Center, Hartley Room
$10, FREE for Friends of Textiles (FOT) members and full-time Florida Tech faculty, staff and students

Join us for an illustrated and interactive lecture by Cloth as Community exhibition curator Geraldine Craig! Hmong “flower cloth” (or paj ntaub) is one of the world’s great textile traditions. Despite its deep roots in Hmong culture, this complex art was not widely known outside Asia until after the Vietnam War, when Hmong refugees arrived in the United States.

Geraldine Craig is an artist and writer whose research focuses on the intersections and relationships between textile history, theory/criticism, curatorial work and studio practice. Her writing is formed by modes of knowing as a maker, with primary research interests in contemporary art/craft and Hmong textiles. Craig has published more than a hundred essays on contemporary art and Hmong textiles, in venues such as the Hmong Studies Journal, The Journal of Modern Craft, Art in America, and Surface Design Journal.

“Symbolism of Pattern in the Culture of the Bedouin” by Alfred Madain

Tuesday, April 11, 2017
Reception 5:15 p.m.; Lecture 6 p.m.
Denius Student Center, Hartley Room
$10, FREE for Friends of Textiles (FOT) members and full-time Florida Tech faculty, staff and students

Alfred Madain will present an illustrated lecture that explores three essential aspects of Bedouin lifestyle - the Bedouin home and the role it plays in social structure; the fabrics, methods, and patterns of Bedouin weaving; and Bedouin dress with a look at the significance of embroidery and pattern and their connection to identity.

Alfred Madain was born and raised in Jordan and has traveled widely throughout the Arab/Islamic world. He is a professional social scientist and teaches the subject of Human Geography. A musician and ethnomusicologist, Alfred gives lectures on the lifestyle of the Bedouin, the Bedouin home, and music of the Arab and Islamic world. He has stayed with Bedouin people on his travels and will share detailed information on the Bedouin’s idea of honor, law, kinship, gender roles in the home, and hierarchy of social relationships.

Accommodations for the Friends of Textiles Lecture Series sponsored by Courtyard by Marriott-Melbourne West.

Media support provided in part by:

 

Curator's Gallery Tour of Traditional Arts of the Bedouin by Amber Clifford-Napoleone, PhD

Tuesday, March 21, 2017
Reception 5:15 p.m.; Lecture 6 p.m.
Funk Center Mezzanine and Galleries$10, FREE for Friends of Textiles (FOT) members and full-time Florida Tech faculty, staff and students

Dr. Amber Clifford-Napoleone is Associate Professor of Anthropology and serves as Curator at the McClure Archives and University Museum at the University of Central Missouri. Her research interests are in the intersection of popular music, popular culture, and sexual subcultures in the United States. Her expertise in museum science is in textiles and textile preventative conservation, museum anthropology, and Bedouin material culture. She is currently completing a study of the intersection of queer identities and heavy metal music.

 

Gallery Tour by Featured Artist Gerry Trilling

Tuesday, November 15, 2016
Reception 5:15 p.m.; Lecture 6 p.m.
Funk Center Mezzanine and Galleries
$10, FREE for Friends of Textiles (FOT) members and full-time Florida Tech faculty, staff and students

Gerry Trilling is a conceptual artist whose work is rooted in the history and assimilation of the American Jewish Diaspora. Her parents escaped the Holocaust, relocating to St. Louis where she grew up in a community of immigrants. Trilling’s experiences there have greatly influenced her body of work, particularly as it relates to the concept of “home” and community. Her abstract work incorporates a variety of fabrics meant to mark the passage of time and emphasize the unique way patterns relate to a larger visual landscape.

Trilling earned a BFA in Painting from the Kansas City Art Institute. She has studied weaving, dyeing and paper making, and traveled extensively collecting materials and conducting independent studies in Asia, South America, Australia and Europe. The artist is currently engaged in a three year residency at Studios Inc. in Kansas City where she will be presenting a large pattern-based show in May 2017.

 

Gallery Tour by Featured Artist Garry Noland

Tuesday, October 18, 2016
Reception 5:15 p.m.; Lecture 6 p.m.
Funk Center Mezzanine and Galleries
$10, FREE for Friends of Textiles (FOT) members and full-time Florida Tech faculty, staff and students

Garry Noland's studio practice is open to “rough patches”, glitches or mistakes. Edges or boundaries between mistakes establish immediate contextual and formal relationships. Those abutments mime our interactions with art and with each other. Noland writes, "I am at ease with the natural marks and debris left in the foam, for example, in Failed Monuments. Art mimes the systems and appearances we experience in both the non-human and human parts of nature. The opposing sheen and luxurious suggestions of the gold tape against the foam examines just those combinations of new and old, planned and not". In addition he writes, "The oft-quoted role of the free press is 'to afflict the comfortable and comfort the afflicted'. Art's first cousin role then, is to find the mundane in the grand and the grand in the mundane".

Noland earned a degree in History of Art from the University of Missouri-Kansas City and has been a studio artist since 1980. He has received fellowship awards from the NEA/Mid-America Arts Alliance and the Charlotte Street Foundation. Recent exhibits have been at the Daum Museum of Contemporary Art (Sedalia, MO) and University of Northern Iowa. Noland has been based in the Mid-west and recently moved to Los Angeles.

Gallery Talk by featured artist Alex Trimino

Tuesday, March 29, 2016
Reception 5:15 p.m.; Lecture 6 p.m.
Ruth Funk Center Galleries
$10 Admission; Free for Friends of Textiles members and FIT faculty, staff, and full-time students

Alex Trimino creates illuminated fiber-based sculptures and installations. Her work re-contextualizes the traditional use of colloquial, lo-tech crafts; crochet, knittings and weavings exploring social views on civilization, technology and gender. In her work old things, old ways and new technologies commingle together; exploring how we connect to reality today. She uses embroidery and technology, creating a connection between past and present.

Trimino was born in Colombia and lives and works in Miami, FL. She attended Ox-Bow Artist Residency affiliated with the school of the Art Institute of Chicago as a recipient of the Joan Mitchell Foundation Scholarship for Visual Artist. In 2013 Trimino's work was part of "OpenArt" International Art Symposium, Sweden and her solo exhibition "Dark Light" was presented at Läns Museum, West Gallery, Örebro, Sweden. Her 2012 solo exhibition "Luminous" was presented at Art and Cultural Center of Hollywood, FL. In 2011 Trimino's work was part of "Witness to Creativity" at Florida Museum for Women Artists. Trimino has been the recipient of grants and awards, from The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum, The Elliot Museum, Appleton Museum of Art, Rawls Museum Arts, Cambridge Art Association and Joan Mitchell Foundation.

"The Interdisciplinary Nature of Contemporary Fiber-based Art" by Alison Ferris, Curator of the John Michael Kohler Arts Center

November 17, 2015
Denius Student Center, Hartley Room
Reception 5:15 pm; Lecture 6pm
$10; free for members and Florida Tech faculty, staff and students

Alison Ferris has been a curator for over twenty years and is known for her exhibitions that offer contemporary, critical engagement within a broad-based art historical perspective. Previously, Ferris served as assistant director of the Maine Arts Commission where she managed the public art program among other responsibilities. As curator at Bowdoin College Museum of Art from 1996 to 2008, she curated over twenty-five exhibitions of contemporary art. Ferris has served on grant review panels, lectured and taught at institutions across the United States, and has written numerous essays and articles on contemporary art. Ferris holds an M.A. in art history from Binghamton University and a B.A. in art history from University of North Carolina, Greensboro.

"Skirting Around The Textile Arts - From Michelin Man To Site-Specific Installations” by artist Karen Rifas

Tuesday, October 20, 2015
Denius Student Center, Hartley Room
Reception 5:15 pm; Lecture 6pm
$10; free for members and Florida Tech faculty, staff and students

Karen Rifas’ body of work includes site- specific installations using materials such as stitched leaves, cords, cable and household paint; content centered exhibitions which deal with environmental, political and social issues; and conceptual drawings. “I reside in a Miami home surrounded by Florida Live Oak trees,” she states, “nature and the environment bring with it an internal world of serenity, order and peace. Certain themes and concerns continually surface in my work. Generally, they reflect my thoughts about the delicate and precarious balance which I find in life and in nature, between structure and freedom and in the rhythmic and chaotic changes that occur in life.” Rifas is particularly fascinated with taking ordinary materials and rearranging them into new contexts.

Karen Rifas was born in Chicago and lives and works in Miami. She received her MFA from the University of Miami and has taught at many institutions including New World School of the Arts and the University of Miami. Rifas has an extensive national and international exhibition record. She has been awarded a South Florida Cultural Consortium and two Florida Visual Arts Fellowships and her work is in the collections of Perez Art Museum Miami (PAMM), Museum of Contemporary Art North Miami, Museum of Art, Ft. Lauderdale and Museo de Arte de Ponce, Puerto Rico.

“From the Bamboo Grove to the Studio, the Creative Journey” by Charissa Brock

Tuesday, April 7, 2015—Reception 5:15 p.m.; Lecture 6 p.m.
Denius Student Center, Hartley Room (Florida Tech Campus)
$10 Admission; Free for Friends of Textiles members and FIT faculty, staff, and full-time students

Bamboo is a plant with a complex growth pattern, yet it has a simple and elegant structure which lends itself to being a dynamic art material. Through studio-based research and object making, artist Charissa Brock has been creating one-of-a-kind bamboo sculptures with ornate details. In her studio, her question-based exploration yields new techniques to apply to the work.

Her lecture will include a survey of the development of her work and information about bamboo as a living growing plant.

Brock, who works and teaches out of her studio in Portland, Ore., has been making artwork with natural materials since 1994. She discovered bamboo as an art material in 1999 while earning her MFA at Tyler School of Art in Philadelphia, Pa. Featured in numerous publications, Brock’s work has also been exhibited widely in the United States and is included in the collection of Arizona State University Museum.

 

“Bamboo and Japanese Culture”

by Reiko Nishioka
Tuesday, March 17, 2015—Reception 5:15 p.m.; Lecture 6 p.m.
Denius Student Center, Hartley Room (Florida Tech Campus)
$10 Admission; Free for Friends of Textiles members and FIT faculty, staff, and full-time students

Bamboo, a symbol of longevity and prosperity, has been used for centuries as building material, garden fences, kitchen utensils, paper, writing materials and toys. Modern technology has advanced its usage for automotive interior design and fiber for clothing. This lecture will highlight the characteristics of bamboo, examine the versatility of bamboo products, and how bamboo is closely tied to Japanese culture.

Reiko Nishioka, a native of Kyoto, Japan, is the recently retired director of education from the Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens in Delray Beach, Fla. She served as its director of education for 20 years and continues to research and teach about Japanese culture. Nishioka received her master’s degree in museum leadership from the Bank Street College of Education in New York and has spent terms as the artist in residence at Williams College in Williamstown, Mass., the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C., and the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston.

Gallery Talk by featured artist Ann Clarke

Tuesday, October 21, 2014
Reception 5:15 p.m.; Lecture 6 p.m.
Ruth Funk Center Galleries
$10 Admission; Free for Friends of Textiles members and FIT faculty, staff, and full-time students

Ann Clarke serves as dean of Syracuse University’s College of Visual and Performing Arts. Clarke has exhibited her work across the U.S. and internationally, including at the Noyes Museum of Art in Oceanville, N.J.; gallery gen in New York City; Dongshin University in the Republic of Korea; and the Everson Museum of Art. In her studio, Two Sticks Knitting, she creates one-of-a-kind art-to-wear, including coats, hats, and wall hangings. Her work is featured in many private collections and has been published extensively. She holds a bachelor of fine arts degree in painting and printmaking from the University of Michigan and a master of fine arts degree in textiles from the Rhode Island School of Design.

Gallery Talk by featured artist Kerr Grabowski

November 18, 2014
Reception 5:15 p.m.; Lecture 6 p.m.
Ruth Funk Center Galleries
$10 Admission; Free for Friends of Textiles members and FIT faculty, staff, and full-time students

Kerr Grabowski’s history as a fiber artist has been marked by her constant experimentation with innovative approaches to dyeing and screening processes. She developed Deconstructed Screen Printing, a monoprinting technique allowing for a freer, more painterly approach to screen printing. Formerly Artist in Residence at Peters Valley Craft Center in NJ, Kerr now maintains a studio in Bay Saint Louis, Mississippi. Recipient of a Mississippi Arts Commission Fellowship and a New Jersey Council on the Arts Fellowship, Kerr is published in Ornament, Surface Design Journal, Fiber Arts Design Book Six and Silk Painting for Fashion and Fine Art and Textiles Now.

“Behind the Veil: Brides and Their Dresses”

by Karen J. Herbaugh, Curator, American Textile History Museum

Tuesday, April 8, 2014
Reception 5:15 p.m.; Lecture 6 p.m.
Denius Student Center, Hartley Room (FL Tech Campus)
$10 Admission; Free for Friends of Textiles members and FIT faculty, staff, and full-time students  

Join Karen Herbaugh, curator at the American Textile History Museum, as she explores how brides over more than 100 years have chosen their wedding dresses, and how their decisions are shaped by fashion, family, and finances. This presentation will highlight not only the dresses worn on the big day, but the stories of the women who wore them. How have women created alternatives to the iconic white dress, or how have they embraced the fairytale wedding? More than an historical survey, Ms. Herbaugh will explore generations of women and the stories of their bridal attire.

“What Did the Bride Wear?” 

By Dr. Joanne Eicher, Regents Professor Emerita, University of Minnesota

Tuesday, March 11, 2014
Reception 5:15 p.m.; Lecture 6 p.m.
Denius Student Center, Hartley Room (FL Tech Campus)
$10 Admission; Free for Friends of Textiles members and full-time students

Rituals for the bride often begin before the wedding itself with emphasis placed on preparations for her hair, her body (with henna designs on her hands and feet, for example) and the jewelry and accessories she will wear. Across time and space both similarities and differences exist and discussion of contemporary developments will be included with examples of theme, destination, and gay and lesbian wedding fashion.

Dr. Eicher is the Regents Professor Emerita for the Department of Design, Housing, and Apparel at the University of Minnesota.  She is a specialist in global costume and the author of numerous books including Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion (2010) and The Visible Self: Global Perspectives on Dress (2008), Culture and Society and Mother, Daughter, Sister, Bride: Rituals of Womanhood (2005).

“Yoruba Masquerades: Ancestors and Mothers”

By Dr. Robin Poynor, Professor of Art History, University of Florida

Tuesday, November 5, 2013
Reception 5:15 p.m.; Lecture 6 p.m.
Denius Student Center, Hartley Room
$10 Admission; Free for Friends of Textiles members and full-time students

Robin Poynor will present an illustrated lecture on the colorful masquerades of the Yoruba Culture of West Africa.  Poynor teaches the arts of Africa and Oceania in the School of Art and Art History at the University of Florida.  He has studied the arts of Africa for over 40 years and earned his Ph.D. from Indiana University. Poynor has contributed to numerous books including A History of African Art (co-author) and Africa in Florida: 500 Years of African Presence.  His current work includes the exhibition and catalog for Kongo Across the Waters – an upcoming exhibition at the Harn Museum of Art in Gainesville, FL.

“Is Eco-Fashion an Oxymoron?”

by Yuka Yoneda, Senior Editor of Ecouterre.com

Tuesday, April 9, 2013
Reception 5:15 p.m.; Lecture 6 p.m.
Denius Student Center, Hartley Room
$10 Admission; Free for Friends of Textiles members and full-time students

The term "eco-fashion" has gained popularity in the past few years, but is it actually impossible for fashion - with its frenetic production cycle and planned obsolescence - to ever truly be green? In a lecture entitled "Is Eco-Fashion an Oxy-Moron?", editor Yuka Yoneda explores ethical and environmental reforms taking place within the fashion industry as well as psychological and societal thought patterns that are beginning to shift in the consumer mind. Despite what retailers might have us believe, green garments go way beyond a tag that says "organic cotton" or "recycled polyester". This fascinating talk will take a look into what drives us to buy clothing the way we do and how, if at all, fashion can evolve towards a better future.

Yuka Yoneda is a Senior Editor at Ecouterre.com, a website devoted to the future of sustainable fashion. She holds a degree in exhibit design from the Fashion Institute of Technology and a bachelor’s degree in business management from Stony Brook University. Yuka's refashioned clothing and DIY ideas have been featured on The Today Show, Glamour, HGTV.com and other websites and magazines. Yuka has also written for The Daily Green and The New York Times.

“ReDress: Upcycled Style”

by Guest Artist Nancy Judd

Tuesday, March 12, 2013
Reception 5:15 p.m.; Lecture 6 p.m.
Denius Student Center, Hartley Room
$10 Admission; Free for Friends of Textiles members and full-time students

Nancy Judd is an artist and environmental educator who creates couture fashion sculptures from trash through her business Recycle Runway. Environmental education is at the heart of Ms. Judd’s work-- her goal is to inspire people in a positive, fun and creative context to live lighter on the earth. She has given hundreds of presentations around the country to both youth and adults including a TEDx in Albuquerque, NM in 2011, and another in Santa Fe, NM in November 2012.

“Battles on the Bed:  Russo-Japanese War Victory Images on Japanese Picture Ikat”

By Ann Marie Moeller

Tuesday, December 4, 2012
Reception 5:15 p.m.; Lecture 6 p.m.
Denius Student Center, Hartley Room
$10 Admission; Free for Friends of Textiles members and full-time students

The victory over Imperial Russia in 1905 was a watershed event for Japan that signaled to its citizens that they had entered the ranks of the industrialized world powers.  Only 50 years before the leaders of pre-industrial Japan realized they were in danger of being colonized by Western nations and began a concentrated effort at modernization, focusing on the military.

Pride in this victory was celebrated throughout Japan in many ways.  This lecture will focus on the Russo-Japanese War (1904-05) victory images woven in e-gasuriE-gasuri  is a labor intensive ikat resist technique where threads are dyed before being put on the loom in a way that produces a picture when woven.  Most of these textiles were made into futon (bedding) covers.  The most elaborate were prized trousseau items.

Japanese textile scholar Ann Marie Moeller will explore the seeming contradictions of producing images of industrialization with hand dying and hand weaving techniques and producing images of war for the marriage bed.

“Imperial Japanese Good Luck Flags and One-Thousand Stitch Belts”

By Dr. Michael Bortner

Tuesday, October 16, 2012
Reception 5:15 p.m.; Lecture 6 p.m.
Denius Student Center, Hartley Room
$10 Admission; Free for Friends of Textiles members and full-time students

Dr. Michael Bortner will discuss his private collection and research of Japanese “good luck” flags and “one-thousand” stitch belts.  According to informal polls, the second most popular souvenir item brought back by American service personnel of the WWII era was a Japanese character signed flag.  Known as hinomaru yosegaki, a “good luck flag” was a personal, one-of-a kind item given to a departing soldier by his family, friends and coworkers.  They contained the names, personal messages, exultations, poems, artwork, battle maps and even blood from those people wishing him well into battle.

Senninbari or "one-thousand stitch belts” as they are known today probably developed over hundreds of years and are based upon the Asian principle of "ki" or abdomen-centered life force.  Over time, the cloth senninbari evolved into an amulet of protection that was believed to protect the wearer from harm in battle.

Both of these unique items reflect folk beliefs applied to an emergent modern military world view.

"Fashionably Wrapped: the Influence of Kashmir Shawls”

by Natalia Nekrassova

Tuesday, April 10, 2012
Reception 5:15 p.m.; Lecture 6:00 p.m.
Denius Student Center, Hartley Room
$10 general admission; free for Friends of Textiles members and full-time students

Curator of Collections and Research at the Textile Museum of Canada, Natalia will discuss her 2009 exhibition Fashionably Wrapped: the Influence of Kashmir Shawls. Fashionably Wrapped traces the origins of the shawl from the noble courts of India, where finely woven pieces were made and worn for several centuries, to the high-fashion market in Europe, where shawls were desired for their unusual beauty and exquisite weaving.  

Natalia has over 30 years experience as a museum curator. Before joining the Textile Museum of Canada in 2002 she was a Senior Researcher, Keeper of Rugs and Decorative Art collections at the State Museum of Oriental Art in Moscow. She has curated many exhibitions of traditional art and textiles in Moscow and abroad in collaboration with museums in Europe and Asia. For more than 20 years she organized and participated in yearly field trips to Central Asia, Siberia and the Caucasus for research and acquisition of the artifacts for the Museum’s collection. She was an Expert/Consultant on Oriental rugs with the Russian Ministry of Culture and lectured on Islamic art in the Islamic University in Moscow.

At the Textile Museum of Canada Natalia’s research and exhibition interests are in the traditional textiles of Central Asia and the Middle East. Through the series of exhibitions such as “All the Beauty of the World: Rugs from the Land of the Caucasus”, “Wandering Weavers: Nomadic Traditions of Asia”, “Between the Sea and the Desert: the Many Cultures of North Africa”, “Fashionably Wrapped: the Influence of Kashmir Shawls” and others, she made historic and contemporary textiles from Asia and North Africa available to the public within the rich context of the traditional cultures of the regions. Since 2002, in the course of four web projects, she has been intensively cataloguing the TMC’s collection of over 12,000 artifacts to bring it online for global access.

“The Creative Journey”

by Anita Luvera Mayer

Tuesday, March 27, 2012
Reception 5:15 p.m.; Lecture 6:00 p.m.
Denius Student Center, Hartley Room 
$10 general admission; free for Friends of Textiles members and full-time students

Anita Luvera Mayer is a designer of contemporary clothing inspired by ethnic originals with finishes and embellishments done by hand.  Anita’s work has been included in national and international exhibits; she is the author of five books and frequently presents articles in major fiber publications.  Anita believes there should be something magical and unique about what is worn each day and shares that concept of clothing with others through the workshops and lectures.

Interwoven Guest Artist, Alejandrina Cué

Friday, December 16, 6 p.m. (5:15 reception)
Ruth Funk Center for Textile Arts Galleries
$10 general admission; free for Friends of Textiles members and full-time students

Cué lives in Havana, Cuba. In addition to her fine arts degrees from the Matanzas School of Fine Arts and the National School of Drawing in Havana, Cué studied at the Bauhaus School of Design in Germany. Her works have been included in numerous international exhibitions and she has received numerous awards of distinction throughout her artistic career.

"Thread Upon Thread: Works and Processes of a Conceptual Weaver"

by Interwoven Guest Artist, Andrea Donnelly

Thursday, October 6th
Reception 5:15; Lecture 6 p.m.
Gleason Center for Performing Arts
$10 general admission; free for Friends of Textiles members and full-time students

Donnelly has translated her artistic vision into successful exhibits at both the national and international level, including shows at the Rijswijk Textile Biennal in Rijswijk, Netherlands, Cutting Edge at the Textile Arts Center in Brooklyn, NY, Fiberart International 2010, and many others. The recipient of the prestigious Windgate Fellowship, Donnelly received her undergraduate degrees in Psychology and Art & Design from North Carolina State University and an MFA in Fibers from Virginia Commonwealth University.

"The Art of Fashion and the Fashion of Art"

by Bernice Steinbaum, Ph.D

Tuesday, April 5th
Reception 5:15 p.m.; Lecture 6 p.m.,
Gleason Performing Arts Center (Florida Tech Campus)
Tickets: $10; Free for Friends of Textiles members & full-time students

Celebrate the closing month of the Little Black Dress exhibit with a lecture by legendary gallerist and contemporary art maven, Bernice Steinbaum, Ph.D. Steinbaum was a gallery director for 27 years in SoHo, NYC, and then moved Bernice Steinbaum Gallery to Miami in 2000. President and founder of the Miami Art Exchange and president and founder of CAD (Community of Art Dealers in and near the Design District), Steinbaum has been a force in the exploding Miami art scene for the past ten years. The Bernice Steinbaum Gallery boasts representing two Macarthur “Genius” award winners; five Guggenheim, multiple National Endowment Winners, two Annenberg fellows, among other awards.

An energetic and inspiring public speaker, with numerous awards and publications to her name, Steinbaum will discuss her 2009 exhibition “The Art of Fashion and the Fashion of Art.”

"Introduction to eTextiles"

by Lynne Bruning

Thursday, March 10th
Reception 5:15 p.m.; Lecture 6 p.m.,
Denius Student Center, Hartley Room (Florida Tech Campus)
Tickets: $10; Free for Friends of Textiles members & full-time students

eTextiles are fabrics that enable computing, digital components and electronics to be embedded in them. Part of the development of wearable technology, they are referred to as intelligent clothing or smart clothing that allow for the incorporation of built-in technological elements in everyday textiles and clothes. eTextiles is not necessarily "wearable computing" because more emphasis is placed on hiding the technology within the fabric. While not part of the mainstream form of fashion, the popularity of eTextiles is increasing as more research is being devoted to it.

Lynne Bruning is the creator of exclusive wearable art, eTextiles, adaptive technologies and decorative fabrics. Fusing together her education in neurophysiology, Masters degree in architecture and her family history in textiles, Lynne creatively cross-pollinates the worlds of science, textiles and fashion with her innovative award winning designs. You can learn more by visiting her website: http://www.lbruning.com/ 

“The Language of Mayan Textiles”

by Stephanie Schneiderman

Tuesday, December 7th;
Reception 5:15 p.m.; Lecture 6 p.m.,
Denius Student Center, Hartley Room (Florida Tech Campus)

Stephanie Schneiderman was born in Havana, grew up in Mexico City and is the founder and CEO of Tia Stephanie Tours, a company that offers Cultural and Educational Journeys to Mexico, focusing on art history, textile traditions, ancient civilizations of Mesoamerica and present-day indigenous festivals.  She will discuss the cosmological symbolism inherent in the Mayan designs woven by the women of the Chiapas Highlands.

Tickets: $10; Free for Friends of Textiles members & full-time students

"Textiles: Living and Dyeing in the Indigenous Americas"

by Laura Wingfield, PhD

Tuesday, October 5, 2010
Reception 5:15 p.m., Lecture 6 p.m.
Florida Tech Campus, Denius Student Center’s Hartley Room

Dr. Laura Wingfield will discuss textile traditions across the indigenous Americas from the earliest finds in Guitarrero Cave in the Andes, dating to 8600 BCE, through the rise of the primacy of textiles throughout the Andes, Central America, and Mesoamerica. Due to the dry climate of the Andes, textiles there are in a greater state of preservation, but more permanent ancient objects -- those in stone and clay -- attest to the importance of textiles from Mexico southward to Colombia. Some motifs are shared throughout the pre-Columbian world: from images of twisted strands of thread in Maya art that act as an umbilical cord between this world and the spirit world to serpentine twisted strands motifs in Costa Rican art that adorn thousands of human effigies and proclaim their connection with their spirit world to innumerable examples of twisted strands motifs actually in Andean textiles, which reinforce the origin of the textile itself: spun, twisted threads. Today, modern indigenous peoples from Mexico to Peru continue ancient spinning, dyeing, and weaving traditions and belief systems based on the importance of textiles: highlights of current practices from Mexico, Guatemala, Costa Rica, Ecuador, and Peru will round out the talk.

"Stitching the Flat World Together"

by Skye Morrison, Ph.D.

Thursday, April 8, 2010
Reception - 6:15 p.m.; Lecture - 7 p.m.
Florida Tech Campus, Denius Student Center’s Hartley Room

For 22 years, Morrison taught at the Sheridan School of Crafts and Design in Oakville, Ontario. She curated the Adivasi Indian and Canadian Inuit collaborative exhibition “Images Tell Stories: Thread Has a Life of Its Own” at Harbourfront, Toronto, in 2004. In 1999, she co-curated the exhibition “Stitching Women’s Lives: Sujuni and Khatwa from Bihar, India” at the Textile Museum of Canada. Sujuni and khatwa are a form of embroidery in Bihar.

Morrison received her doctorate in folklore from the University of Pennsylvania and her master’s degree in design from Cornell University. Her work in India continues through technical writing, forming a sujuni group in Bihar and a khatwa group of Adivasi women in Jharkhand, India, and in Canada.

"Cosmology and East Asian Textile Design"

by Lee Talbot

Thursday, March 18, 7 p.m. 

Denius Student Center, Hartley Room

This lecture presents a selection of intricately patterned Chinese and Korean silks and considers some of the meanings and connotations their designs may have held at the time when they were made. Cosmological beliefs current in dynastic East Asia encouraged the idea that human actions-including the design of the material world-could affect the workings of the cosmos and ensure that it responded in a desired way.  

Speaker Bio

Associate Curator of Eastern Hemisphere Collections at The Textile Museum, Lee chairs the museum's Exhibitions Task Force and leads curatorial efforts related to the museum's collection of East Asian textiles through exhibitions, publications, and public programs. Lee has an M.B.A. from the Thunderbird School of Global Management and an M.A. and M.Phil. from The Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, Design, and Culture, where he is completing a Ph.D. in decorative art history.

Before joining The Textile Museum, Lee served for two and a half years as curator at the Chung Young Yang Embroidery Museum in Seoul, Korea. His experience also includes work at The Brooklyn Museum of Art and Sotheby's auction house in New York City. Lee has published extensively, and lectures internationally on topics including museum exhibition development as well as East Asian textile and design history. He is on the editorial board of Textile: The Journal of Cloth and Culture.

“Woven Blooms of Nationalism: Russian Hand-Woven Tapestry Technique Shawls, 1825-1855”

by Tanya Williams Wetenhall

Thursday, December 3, 2009  at 7p.m.

Denius Student Center, Hartley Room

Wetenhall will discuss the imagery and historic significance of 19th-century Russian tapestry-woven shawls. 

Wetenhall operates the Tanya Williams Art Services in Sarasota, Fla., where she researches and appraises textiles, dress and couture, as well as Russian fine and decorative art. She is currently an independent curator for the San Angelo Museum of Art’s Undressed (2010-2011), an exhibition that will explore various dress silhouettes of the centuries and the undergarments that have shaped them.            

Wetenhall received an associate in applied science degree in advertising and marketing communications at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York City where she also received a master’s degree in fashion and textile studies. 

"Contemporary Textile Design"

by Wook Kim

Thursday, October 8 at 7 p.m.

Denius Student Center, Hartley Room

Wook Kim, a Brooklyn-based textile designer, will be the guest speaker. Born in Seoul, Korea, his passion for textile design began as a student at the Rhode Island School of Design where he teaches textile art. Also an artist and graphic designer, he worked at Sunbury Textile Mills in New York and graduated with a master’s degree in fine arts from Cranbrook Academy of Art in Michigan.

Kim also designs unique wallpaper art that incorporates animal and exotic motifs, which is available at MatterNYC and MatterBrooklyn design stores. He is inspired largely by the aesthetics of his home country as well as other Asian art forms. His work has been displayed at galleries in New York City, Provincetown, Ma., Washington state, and Seoul and has been critically acclaimed by the New York Times and Elle Décor. Samples of his art are available at http://www.wookkim.com.

"The History of Western Textile Design"

by Adriana Scalamandré Bitter

Tuesday, March 31 at 7 p.m.

Denius Student Center, Hartley Room

Adriana Scalamandré Bitter, daughter of the famous designer, Franco Scalamandré and Co-Chair of Scalamandré fabric company, will present "The History of Western Textile Design" in the Hartley Room of the Denius Student Center. This visually rich lecture will cover 200 years of design history, highlighting methods of historical restoration and the historical silk reproductions for which Scalamandré is famous.

"Kimono as Quilt"

by Yvonne Porcella

Tuesday, February 3, 2009 at 7 p.m.

Gleason Performing Arts Center

“Kimono as Quilt” describes the influence of the Japanese kimono on 20th century textile artists and on her own work. Her wearable art and modern quilts have been featured in major exhibitions, art galleries and museums around the world. She has taught and lectured throughout the United States, Canada, Australia, Europe and Japan.

Special Events

"Uncommon Threads: Shaping Japanese Design"

Featuring Dr. Andreas Marks, Head of the Japanese and Korean Art Department and Director of the Clark Center at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts.

Thursday, February 19, 2015 7:00 p.m.
Lecture: “Lethal Beauty: Design Elements in Samurai Suits of Armor”
Free Admission
Gleason Performing Arts Center (Florida Tech Campus)

Friday, February 20, 2015 10:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.
Luncheon Symposium: “Weaving a Way Forward: Developments in Japanese Bamboo Art”
Tickets: $75 (Limited Availability)
Hartley Room, Denius Student Center

"Uncommon Threads: Tying the Knot"

Florida Institute of Technology’s Ruth Funk Center for Textile Arts presents another elegant and entertaining symposium, featuring the 10th annual Ruth Funk Lecturer in Textiles, John E. Vollmer, owner of Vollmer Cultural Consultants Inc.

Thursday, February 13, 2014 6:00 p.m. 
Lecture: “Making Manchu Identity”
Free Admission
Gleason Performing Arts Center (Florida Tech Campus)

Friday, February 14, 2014 10:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.
Luncheon Symposium: "Wedding in Red, tying the knot in traditional China"
Tickets: $60 (Limited Availability)
Hartley Room, Denius Student Center 

"Uncommon Threads: Mad Fashion"

Florida Institute of Technology’s Ruth Funk Center for Textile Arts presents another elegant and entertaining symposium, featuring the 9th annual Ruth Funk Lecturer in Textiles, Lauren D. Whitley, curator in the David and Roberta Logie Department of Textile and Fashion Arts at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

Thursday, February 7, 2013 6:00 p.m. 
Lecture: “Hippie Chic”
Free Admission
Gleason Performing Arts Center (Florida Tech Campus)

Friday, February 8, 2013 10:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.
Luncheon Symposium: "London Calling: British Fashions from the Titanic to Today "
Tickets: $60 (Limited Availability)
Hartley Room, Denius Student Center 

“Uncommon Threads: Exotic Luxuries"

Uncommon Threads Exotic Luxuries Florida Institute of Technology’s Ruth Funk Center for Textile Arts presents another elegant and entertaining symposium, featuring the 8th annual Ruth Funk Lecturer in Textiles, Marilyn Garrow of Marilyn Garrow Fine Textile Art, London.

Thursday, February 23, 2012 6:00 p.m. 
Lecture: “The Threads of Civilization”
Free Admission
Gleason Performing Arts Center (Florida Tech Campus)

Friday, February 24, 2012 10:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.
Luncheon Symposium: "The Love of Textiles"
Tickets: $60 (Limited Availability)
Hartley Room, Denius Student Center 

“Uncommon Threads: Little Black Dress" featuring Valerie Steele, PhD

Uncommon Threads Little Black DressFlorida Institute of Technology’s Ruth Funk Center for Textile Arts presents another elegant and entertaining symposium, featuring the 7th annual Ruth Funk Lecturer in Textiles, Dr. Valerie Steele, Director and Chief Curator of The Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York City. 

Free Lecture

Thursday, Feb. 17 at 6 p.m.
“Gothic: Dark Glamour”
Gleason Performing Arts Center (Florida Tech Campus)

Luncheon Symposium

Friday, Feb. 18
10:30 a.m.: Lecture, "The Black Dress"
11:30 a.m.: Reception and Silent Auction
Noon: Luncheon
Denius Student Center, Hartley Room

 

"Uncommon Threads: English Embroidery" featuring Melinda Watt

Uncommon Threads English Embroidery

Uncommon Threads: English Embroidery presents the 6th Annual Ruth Funk Lecturer in Textiles: Melinda Watt, Assoc. Curator, Dept. of European Sculpture and Decorative Arts and Supervising Curator of the Antonio Ratti Textile Center, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY, NY. 

Free Lecture

Thursday, February 18, 2010 at 7 p.m. - Gleason Performing Arts Center
"The Biblical "It" Girls: Female Heroines in English Embroidery"

Luncheon Symposium

Friday, February 19, 2010 -  Hartley Room, Denius Student Center
10:30 a.m. Lecture: "'Twixt Art and Nature: Floral Imagery in English Embroidery"

Noon – 2 p.m. Luncheon

 

"Uncommon Threads: Fashioning Kimono" featuring Annie Van Assche

Uncommon Threads Fashioning Kimono

Uncommon Threads: Fashioning Kimono presents the 5th Annual Ruth Funk Lecturer in Textiles: Annie Van Assche. author of Fashioning Kimono: Dress and Modernity in Early Twentieth-Century Japan (Milan, 2005), published to accompany an international traveling exhibition by London's Victoria & Albert Museum. Booksigning reception to follow slide presentation.

Free Lecture

Thursday, February 19, 2009 7 p.m. - Gleason Performing Arts Center
"The Kimono and Western Dress in the Early 20th Century: a Revolution in Fashion"

Luncheon Symposium

Friday, February 20, 2009 - Hartley Room, Denius Student Center
10:30 a.m. Lecture
Noon - 1:30 Luncheon

Other Events 

 A Botanical Aromatic Journey with Doreen DeSerres-DuJardin

Saturday, August 5
1–3 p.m.
Ruth Funk Center Mezzanine, 2nd floor
Cost: $15 for FOT members; $20 for non-members, Preregistration required

Join vintage aromatherapist Doreen DeSerres-DuJardin of Nature’s Spirit on an aromatic journey of essential oils inspired by the Flora & Fiber exhibit. Experience the fragrance of select oils while learning about their cultural aspects, aromatic profiles, and other properties. Participants will take away a fragrance test strip and informational hand out for each of the oils discussed.

Please note: As this is an olfactory experience, we ask everyone to be fragrance free for this event.

Please pre-register by Friday, July 28 to textiles@fit.edu or 321-674-6129.

Gallery Talk by featured artist Karen Rips, A View Within

Saturday, July 23, 1:00 p.m.
Ruth Funk Center Galleries
Free Admission

Karen Rips is a native California fiber artist whose experience as a neonatal nurse for twenty-five years has played a significant role in her approach to art and how she views the people and things around her. Over the years, Rips has created work that has explored both the physical and the emotional aspects of the human body. Artistically she has found herself abstracting the complex into the simplest of shapes, lines and spaces.

Rips is a Juried Artist Member of SAQA and SDA. Her current body of work is focused on the interpretation of medical imaging through the use of X-rays, MRI’s and CT scans. This has resulted in A View Within, her collaboration with fellow artist Paula Chung now in its sixth year.

Gallery Talk by featured artist Wen Redmond, Radical Elements

Saturday, May 28, 2:00 p.m.
Ruth Funk Center Galleries
Free Admission

Join artist Wen Redmond as she discusses the digital design techniques utilized in her quilt “Lighter than Air” (on view May 28 – August 27, 2016). This event is presented in conjunction with the opening of the upcoming exhibition Radical Elements by the international organization Studio Art Quilt Associates.

"Digital Explorations in Fiber and Mixed Media" - A Demonstration by featured artist Wen Redmond, Radical Elements

Saturday, May 28, 10:30 a.m.
P133 (next to Evans Library, Florida Tech Campus)
Cost: $10, $5 for Friends of Textiles members.
Preregistration required (textiles@fit.edu or 321-674-6129)

New England artist, Wen Redmond explores her medium, fiber, focusing on experimentation and expanding its presentation. Her unique artistic work merges digital processes, photography, collage, media mix and surface design.

Wen has created several signature Digital Fiber Techniques; Holographic Images creating 3-D effects, Textured Photographs using molding paste and a innovative Serendipity Collage method. Her latest work continues experimenting with digital photography, manipulating and printing images on medium substrates.

She has been published widely in books and magazines, featured on Quilting Arts Television and has two available DVD workshops with Interweave Publishing. Wen's book with CT Publishing, working title 'Digital Explorations in Fiber and Paper' is due to be published December 2016. Her work has been included in many juried exhibits and collections, including Marvin Fletcher’s, Quilt National collection.

"Southern Accents" Gallery Talk by Dr. Sandra Sider

Saturday, May 16, 2015
1 pm; Ruth Funk Center Galleries
Free Admission

In conjunction with Studio Art Quilt Associates’ regional conference “From Studio to Gallery,” the Ruth Funk Center will offer a gallery talk of its feature exhibition Southern Accents (presented by Studio Art Quilt Associates). The free event will be led by exhibition juror Dr. Sandra Sider, curator of the Texas Quilt Museum in La Grange, TX.

Dr. Sandra Sider, a New York quilt artist and author, has published articles and reviews concerning fiber art and other aspects of visual culture for three decades. Her graduate degrees include an M.A. in art history from the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University and a Ph.D. in comparative literature from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She was president of Studio Art Quilt Associates (2010-2013), and is now Curator of the Texas Quilt Museum in La Grange, TX. Her monograph series, The Studio Quilt, is available online, and her new book, 1000 Quilt Inspirations,(from Quarry) was recently published. Additional information can be found at www.sandrasider.com.

 

Bamboo Demonstration by Featured Artist Tanabe Shouchiku III

Saturday, April 4, 2015
Bamboo Demonstration by featured artist Tanabe Shōchiku III
Florida Tech Botanical Gardens (reception following at Funk Center Galleries)
10:30 a.m.
$25 Admission, $20 for FOT members

As a centerpiece of Modern Twist: Contemporary Japanese Bamboo Art’s run at the Ruth Funk Center for Textile Arts, a fourth generation bamboo artist and heir to his family’s artistic pedigree will present a signature demonstration on the art of bamboo.

Tanabe Shōchiku III, who assumed his artist name in 2008, was born in Osaka Prefecture in 1973. Growing up learning the art of bamboo weaving, Tanabe Shōchiku III first trained under his father (Modern Twist artist Chikuunsai III). In 1999, after graduating from the Department of Sculpture, Faculty of Fine Arts, at Tokyo University of the Arts, Tanabe took part in a two-year training program at the Oita Prefectural Bamboo Craft and Training Support Center, and today is one of the leading up-and-coming bamboo craftsmen in Japan. His work captures the essence of the medium both conceptually and visually, a skill which has garnered Tanabe international acclaim. His work is included in the collections of the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston and the British Museum in London. He is also unusual among Japanese bamboo weavers in that he is active outside Japan as an ambassador for his art form, exhibiting and demonstrating in Australia, Korea, the Netherlands, New Zealand, the U.S., and Switzerland.

 

Wedding Dress Preservation Demonstration

Saturday, April 5, 2014
10:30 am – 11:30 am
Ruth Funk Center for Textile Arts Mezzanine, 2nd Floor
Free Admission

For many brides, the “big day” is over in a flash. Learn how to care for your most cherished bridal memento: the wedding dress. Join the Ruth Funk Center’s Collections Manager, Sarah Smith, for a special demonstration as she presents instructions and techniques for the proper care, storage and preservation of your wedding dress.

RSVP by March 31 to textiles@fit.edu or (321)674-6129

Andean Arpilleras/Peruvian Quilts

"Andean Arpilleras/Peruvian Quilts"

Saturday, December 4th, 10 a.m.
Ruth Funk Center Mezzanine & Galleries

Meet artist, Flora Zárate, as she demonstrates an enchanting textile tradition of the indigenous Quechua.  Arpilleras are appliquéd, quilt-like wall hangings with applied embroidery and three dimensional elements.  Examples of her work will be on display and available for purchase.

Tickets: $10; $5 for Friends of Textiles members; Free for full-time students

 

"Cool Off in Style" at the Ruth Funk Center for Textile Arts as we celebrate the final month of Styling the Modern: Fine Art Meets Fashion.

Styling the Modern: Fine Art Meets Fashion

Thursday, July 29, 2010 at 5:00pm

Funk Center Mezzanine and Galleries
GALLERIES OPEN 5-8 p.m.
Director’s gallery talk at 6 p.m.

Mix and mingle. Learn more about the exhibit from museum docents and meet others interested in the arts…
FREE ADMISSION

Workshops

Anita Luvera Mayer - "Clothing from Simple Shapes"

Wednesday, March 28, 2012 
9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Renee Foosaner Education Center (Foosaner Art Museum)
COST: $110 (FOT and Foosaner Museum members); $125 non-members

This workshop presents the specific methods for creating wearable contemporary garments constructed from simple shapes.  The style of garment, fit, color, fiber, pattern drafting and embellishment are presented along with ways to individualize clothing.  The styles that enhance various body shapes and the philosophy involved in designing for different personalities and life styles are integral parts of this workshop.  The instructor’s woven wardrobe will be available for participants to examine and try-on and there will be an opportunity to copy and size garment patterns.  In addition to the focus on clothing there will be an exploration of simple yet dramatic ways to individualize clothing using mirrors, wrapped rings and beading. 

"Fabric Postcards" by Laurel Merrill

Saturday, June 23, 2012 
10am – 1pm
Science Education Lab (Building 405, Room 107)
Cost: $20 for FOT members; $25 for non-members

Join presenter Laurel Merrill for three hours of fun, transforming fabric scraps, card foundations, crayons, threads and markers into post office acceptable, one-of-a-kind post cards. Anyone would love to find one of these in their mailbox! ALL skill levels welcome.

This is a wonderful opportunity to try out some of those fancy stitches on your machine or any number of quilting/sewing techniques. Provided kits will include materials necessary to make 4 - 5 postcards. You may bring your sewing machine (in good working order with a fresh needle), a variety of threads in your favorite colors, and BSS (Basic Sewing Supplies) - scissors (fabric and paper), snips, rotary cutter and small mat, and necessary sewing machine feet for decorative stitching.

Don't forget your imagination - the sky is the limit!

"Enhancing Machine Appliqué"

Workshop Presenter: Nancy Stewart
Saturday, August 4, 10am – 1pm
Science Education Lab-  Building 405, Room 107 (See Campus Map)
Cost: $20 for FOT members; $25 for non-members

This workshop will present ways in which machine appliqué can be created and enhanced by using Tsukeniko inks and Pebeo Setacolor paints.  Both products are non-toxic and water based.  Each participant will ink-dye fabrics that will be used to create a sunflower and their own appliqué hat.

Participants will also learn basic brush strokes and color mixing techniques; how to incorporate Texture Magic for added dimension; how to create an appliqué from a picture; and more!

Japanese Calligraphy

Instructor Reiko Nishioka, Director of Education, Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens
Monday, November 5, 2012
11 a.m. - noon
Ruth Funk Center Mezzanine (2nd Floor)

$15 Admission; $10 for Friends of Textiles Members and full time Florida Tech students

Join Reiko Nishioka of the Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens for a one-hour workshop and demonstration of Japanese calligraphy. Learn proper writing form and how to write basic Japanese characters with ink and brush.

 

"Fun with Fabric - A Day at the Beach"

Children’s Workshop by Dij Pacarro
Saturday, June 28, 2014 10 a.m. – 12 p.m.
Ruth Funk Center Mezzanine, 2nd Floor
Cost: $25; Ages: 9 -12

Join presenter and Florida in Fabric II artist Dij Pacarro for a special workshop that’s just for kids! No sewing required and all materials are provided.

Please pre-register by June 21 to textiles@fit.edu or (321)674-6129.

 

“Fabric Postcards” by Carol Poole

Saturday, August 9, 10 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Ruth Funk Center Mezzanine, 2nd Floor
Cost: $20 for FOT members; $25 for non-members

Join presenter Carol Poole for three hours of fun, transforming fabric scraps, card foundations, crayons, threads and markers into post office acceptable, one-of-a-kind post cards. Anyone would love to find one of these in their mailbox! ALL skill levels welcome.

Provided kits will include materials necessary to make 4 - 5 postcards. You may bring your sewing machine (in good working order with a fresh needle), a variety of threads in your favorite colors, and BSS (Basic Sewing Supplies) - scissors (fabric and paper), snips, rotary cutter and small mat, and necessary sewing machine feet for decorative stitching.

 

Modern Twist for Kids

Saturday, April 18, 2015
10:00 a.m.- 12:30 p.m.
Ruth Funk Center for Textile Arts Mezzanine, 2nd Floor
$5 Admission, Ages 9-14

Let nature be your inspiration! Join local artisan Viola Knudsen for a morning of pine needle coiling. Participants will explore creativity through the use of natural fibers and raw materials. All supplies provided and each participant will take home a tool kit along with their completed work of art. Pre-registration is required.

 

Impressionist Flowers with Fabric

Saturday, August 8, 10 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Ruth Funk Center Mezzanine, 2nd floor
Cost: $20 for FOT members; $25 for non-members

Create a beautiful, floral art piece in the impressionist tradition using fused snippets of fabric in place of paint strokes. No sewing required in class and all materials are provided.

 

Kids’ Mini Art Quilt Playshop with Linda Geiger

Saturday, June 25, 10 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Ruth Funk Center Mezzanine, 2nd floor
$5 Admission, Ages 9–14, Pre-registration required

After a guided tour of the exhibits, bring your inspiration to the workshop and create your own mini-art quilt, using fabrics, beads, rubber stamps, yarns and embellishments. Take home your quilt and a small bag of supplies to stay creative at home.  All materials will be provided. No experience necessary, although basic hand-sewing knowledge is helpful.

 

Kids’ Fabric Collage Journal Playshop with Deb Taylor

Saturday, November 5, 2016
10 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Ruth Funk Center Mezzanine
$5 Admission, Ages 9–14, Pre-registration required

After a guided tour of the exhibit, bring your inspiration to the workshop and create your own fabric collage journal using scraps of fabrics and specialty papers. Take home your finished journal filled with 14 blank pages perfect for writing, drawing or doodling so that you can stay creative at home.

 

Kids’ Bead Embroidery Playshop by Indian River Chapter of the Embroiderers' Guild of America, Inc.

Saturday, April 29, 2017
10:00 a.m-12:30 p.m.
Ruth Funk Center Mezzanine, 2nd Floor
Cost: $5 Admission, For ages 9-14, Pre-registration required

Join embroiderer Adrienne Meyer for a special playshop that’s just for kids! After a guided tour of the exhibit, bring your inspiration to the workshop and create a beaded pin cushion embellished with a two-letter monogram or an abstract swirl. Learn the basics of bead embroidery with instructors from the Indian River Chapter of The Embroiderers’ Guild of America and take home your pin cushion along with a kit of materials so that you can stay creative at home.


Flora & Fiber Kids’ Natural Dyeing Playshop with Deb Taylor

Saturday, June 17
10 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Ruth Funk Center Mezzanine, 2nd floor
Cost: $5 Admission, For ages 9–14, Preregistration required
Workshop is FULL!

After a guided tour of the exhibit, bring your inspiration to the workshop for a hands-on experience dyeing fabric with natural materials. Watch Deb demonstrate the basics and then create your own samples using an array of natural materials from plant based matter to rust. Take-home kit with instructions and project inspiration included!

We encourage all participants to bring a small rusty item (bottle cap, nail, etc.) and to dress in old clothes!